Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Former Sen. Greg Evers, advocate for law enforcement, dead at 62.

Former Florida Senator Greg Evers, R- Milton, was a passionate advocate for law enforcement and corrections officers. He was found dead Tuesday afternoon in a car crash. He was 62. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]

Former Florida Senator Greg Evers, R- Milton, was a passionate advocate for law enforcement and corrections officers. He was found dead Tuesday afternoon in a car crash. He was 62. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]

TALLAHASSEE — Former State Sen. Greg Evers, the Baker Florida strawberry farmer and veteran politician, was killed in a single car crash hear his home in Okaloosa County. The Florida Highway Patrol confirmed the death late Tuesday, but deferred any further information pending an investigation. He was 62.

Evers, who left the Senate in 2016 to run unsuccessfully for the U.S. Congress, was born in Milton on his family's farm, later attending Pensacola Community College. He took over his family's fertilizer business and moved it to Baker, where he grew cotton, soybeans, peanuts, wheat, corn and strawberries. He was fond of preparing strawberry ice cream and delivering it to his Senate colleagues in Tallahassee.

A passionate advocate for law enforcement and corrections officers, he became a vigorous critic of the Florida Department of Corrections and the Gov. Rick Scott administration for failing to adequately pay and staff the state's prisons.

As chairman of the Senate Criminal Justice Committee, Evers scrutinized the DOC's treatment of several members of the inspector general's staff by having staffers testify about their allegations of cover-up and abuse within the agency.

Evers was first elected to the state House in 2001, where he served until 2010 when he ran for the state Senate.

Contact Mary Ellen Klas at meklas@miamiherald.com. Follow @MaryEllenKlas

Former Sen. Greg Evers, advocate for law enforcement, dead at 62. 08/22/17 [Last modified: Tuesday, August 22, 2017 6:55pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Major earthquake shakes Mexico City

    World

    MEXICO CITY — A powerful earthquake jolted Mexico City on Tuesday, causing buildings to sway sickeningly on the anniversary of a 1985 quake that did major damage to the capital.

  2. For starters: Rays vs. Cubs in Joe Maddon's return to Trop

    Blogs

    Joe Maddon's return to the Trop will be the main story tonight, but there is still a baseball game to be played, between a Cubs team surging toward another division title with six straight wins and a Rays team struggling to keep alive a longshot bid for the second AL wildcard spot.

    RHP Chris Archer will be on …

  3. Review: 'Channel Zero: No-End House' pumps up the prestige horror

    Blogs

    In its second season, Channel Zero cements itself as one of the scariest shows on television.

    Amy Forsyth in Channel Zero: No-End House.
  4. Utilities face barrage of questions as power returns to Tampa Bay

    Energy

    Nearly all of Tampa Bay has electricity again a week after Hurricane Irma shredded the power grid, but elected officials here say the problem is far from solved.

    Duke Energy's Scott Crellin (right) works to cut tree limbs from a power line along S Pinellas Avenue as apprentice lineman Nick Ceccarini looks on Sept. 11, the day after Hurricane Irma struck Florida. [CHRIS URSO  |   Times]
  5. Yep, 2017 hurricane season really is more intense than normal

    Hurricanes

    It was only 25 days ago that Hurricane Harvey made landfall.

    A handout satellite image from Sept. 8, 2017, of, from left, Tropical Storm Katia, Hurricane Irma and Tropical Storm Jose, which would intensify into a hurricane. The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season has been unusually active. There have been 13 named storms this year. Only four other seasons since 1995 have had that many by Sept. 18. [NASA/NOAA GOES Project via the New York Times]