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Aaron Hernandez death ruled suicide, brain goes to science

Attorneys Jose Baez, left, and Ronald Sullivan, who successfully defended  Aaron Hernandez in a double-murder case, hold a briefing outside the state medical examiner's office on Thursday in Boston. [Associated Press]

Attorneys Jose Baez, left, and Ronald Sullivan, who successfully defended Aaron Hernandez in a double-murder case, hold a briefing outside the state medical examiner's office on Thursday in Boston. [Associated Press]

BOSTON — Aaron Hernandez's death in prison has been ruled a suicide and the former NFL star's brain is being donated to sports concussion researchers, Massachusetts authorities said Thursday.

The declaration by prosecutors, state police and public health officials came after a tumultuous day in which Hernandez's lawyer suggested the state was mishandling the investigation and illegally withholding his brain after releasing the rest of the body to a funeral home.

Authorities said the medical examiner had ruled cause of death was asphyxia by hanging and that investigators had found three handwritten notes next to a Bible in Hernandez's cell at the Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center in Shirley. Authorities previously said Hernandez had not left a suicide note and he hadn't been on suicide watch.

"There were no signs of a struggle, and investigators determined that Mr. Hernandez was alone at the time of the hanging," the statement read.

Hernandez had been locked into his cell about 8 p.m. and no one entered the cell until a guard saw him just after 3 a.m. and forced his way in because cardboard had been jammed into the door track to impede entry, authorities said. Hernandez was found hanging from a bedsheet and rushed to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead about an hour later.

Earlier Thursday, Hernandez's lawyer complained that state officials had turned over the 27-year-old's body but not his brain.

Attorney Jose Baez said the family had arranged for researchers at Boston University's Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Center to take custody of the brain. The center studies a progressive degenerative brain disease found in some athletes who have experienced repetitive brain trauma. Hernandez's body is at a Boston-area funeral home, but services will likely be held elsewhere for the Connecticut native.

Baez says he's retained Dr. Michael Baden, a former chief medical examiner for New York City, to perform an independent autopsy.

Baden, who didn't immediately comment, has performed autopsies in several high-profile cases, including the death of Michael Brown, a black teen who was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014.

Baez declined to say whether he or the family believed brain damage from Hernandez's playing days led the 27-year-old former New England Patriots player to kill himself.

"We're not suggesting anything," he said. "You go where the evidence takes you. We need to examine every aspect of this case."

It's generally best for researchers to get access to a brain within hours of death to determine the presence of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or other neurodegenerative diseases, said Dr. Lee Goldstein, a CTE researcher at Boston University. Researchers also prefer to receive the entire brain as a small piece may not tell the whole story, he added.

Other questions surrounding Hernandez's death still remain unanswered.

Authorities have still not released the incident report, officers' logs or video footage from the area around Hernandez's cell, despite repeated requests from the Associated Press.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said he wasn't drawing any conclusions until the full details of investigation are revealed.

"Any time someone kills themselves in prison something clearly went wrong," he said, adding that he had full confidence in prison officials and was unaware of any staff being reprimanded.

Another unknown: Why Hernandez would kill himself just days after the he was cleared of two murder charges?

He had been serving a life sentence without parole for the 2013 slaying of a onetime friend. But during his trial in Boston for the killing of two men in Boston in 2012, he appeared upbeat, constantly backslapping his lawyers, letting out bellowing laughs and blowing kisses to his 4-year-old daughter and other family members in the audience.

The former University of Florida standout died five days after a jury acquitted him in those two deaths, which prosecutors alleged were precipitated by one of the men accidentally spilling a drink on Hernandez at a Boston nightclub.

His death also came just hours before his former New England Patriots teammates visited the White House Wednesday to celebrate their Super Bowl victory.

The apparent suicide left friends, family and his legal team in disbelief as many searched for an explanation to the tragic end of a young man whose football skills at one point earned him a five-year, $40 million contract extension with the NFL's top franchise.

Baez on Thursday said the family was in mourning, but declined to comment on a range of new reports, including that Hernandez was on the phone with his fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins-Hernandez, hours before he was found hanging in his cell early Wednesday. That was first reported by The Boston Globe, citing another one of Hernandez's lawyers.

What's to become of Hernandez's home and other assets is another unanswered question.

The 5,800-square-foot, five-bedroom, seven-bathroom house that he bought not far from Gillette Stadium for $1.3 million in November 2012 is still up for sale. It was put on the market for $1.5 million in March 2016, but the price has since dropped to $1.3 million.

Attorneys for Lloyd's mother have placed an attachment on the house as part of their civil suit against Hernandez. The Internal Revenue Service has a $117,395 lien on the property.

Hernandez's older brother Jonathan "DJ" Hernandez, meanwhile, took to Facebook Thursday to wish his mother, Terri Hernandez, happy birthday.

"I know if Aaron was here one more day he would have said he loves you," he wrote. "Keep smiling because I know Aaron and Dad are both smiling down on you (and) us right now."

Aaron Hernandez death ruled suicide, brain goes to science 04/20/17 [Last modified: Thursday, April 20, 2017 5:08pm]
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