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Katherine Snow Smith, Times Staff Writer

Katherine Snow Smith

Katherine Snow Smith has been at the Times either fulltime or parttime since 1995. She started as a business reporter then spent a decade writing the Rookie Mom column with stories from her own family and advice from other average moms and the experts. She now covers business in south Pinellas County. Katherine has a degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina and is married to Times political editor Adam Smith. They have three children, two dogs and still feel like rookie parents much of the time.

Phone: (727) 893-8785

Email: kssmith@tampabay.com

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  1. Dolls come in all colors at St. Petersburg's Woodson museum

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — As a little girl, Terri Lipsey Scott played with a baby doll named Sindy in Savannah, Ga. Scott is black, Sindy was white. Dana Battle, also black, had a white doll named Toni, in Los Angeles. There weren't many affordable dolls that reflected their race in the late 1950s and early 1960s, said Scott, director of the Carter G. Woodson African American Museum.

    This is why she and Battle, a museum board member, know how important it is for the museum to collect donated dolls of varying hues Sunday at its open house....

  2. Perspective: The year Santa Claus didn't come

    Perspective

    The doctor studied the glob of puss oozing from the patchwork of scabs along my one-year-old son's left index finger.

    "It's definitely infected. And you have no idea when or how it happened?"

    He didn't say it, but here's what I heard next in my head: "I could charge you with gross negligence of your third child and subject you to a court of your peers who would most certainly revoke that Mother's Day card with two little handprints this sweet boy made for you before your failed attempt at motherhood led to the maiming of one of those hands."...

  3. Why is eggnog a holiday tradition? Exploring fresh renditions of the classic drink

    Bars & Spirits

    Eggnog dates back to medieval times when the British enjoyed a drink called "posset" that was made with hot milk, ale and spices. Later it became a drink for the wealthy who added expensive brandy or sherry. It was the alcohol that kept the milk from spoiling when there was no refrigeration.

    When the drink crossed the Atlantic to the New World, Americans used rum. And when rum from the Caribbean was in short supply during the American Revolution, it was replaced with moonshine....

  4. Picturing something different: St. Petersburg man finds second career as photographer

    Business

    A chance meeting during a really tough time in Rossie Newson's life resulted in him finding a talent he never knew he had.

    After leaving his job as an illustrator at the Tampa Bay Times in 2009, Newson devoted most of his time and energy to his father, who had Alzheimer's disease. During this time he met the daughter of one of his father's caregivers and learned she was a wedding photographer....

  5. Wee Gallery entrepreneurs turned black-and-white baby mural into thriving business

    Business

    When Surya Sajnani and Dave Pinto were expecting their first child in 2002, she painted a mural with black and white zebras on one wall of the nursery. The couple had read that a baby's eyes are stimulated by repeating patterns of black and white. "It worked out like we had planned. He would actually stare at the zebras," Sajnani recounted of their son, Sid. "Our friends saw this and said 'You should market that.' "...

  6. Creating PDQ from scratch: CEO of growing brand came from Bucs' front office

    Business

    Shortly after leaving his job as chief financial officer of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to strike out on his own as an entrepreneur, Nick Reader wondered if he'd made the right move.

    "I probably had one of the coolest jobs in Tampa," said Reader, 42. Six years later, the chief executive officer of PDQ restaurants is certain it was the right move.

    "I was at the point where I had a great job (with the Bucs), and I was going to do it the rest of my life or take that tiger by the tail," he recalled, sitting at the PDQ on Park Boulevard in Pinellas Park. He started with the Bucs at age 28, and became the youngest CFO in the National Football League. He worked well with the team's owners, the Glazer family, but of course they had the final say in everything. Reader wanted something of his own....

  7. Every little thing they do is magic

    News

    12.9.17

    I first saw Sting when I was 16 during the Police Synchronicity tour. I was wearing jeans, standing on my seat and screaming my lungs out. Now he's 66 and some of us, wearing heels and evening gowns, wondered how we all got so old as we left a reception for patrons before the singer took the stage with the Florida Orchestra at the Mahaffey Theater.

    After Sting and orchestra music director Michael Francis, a fellow Brit, joked about bringing their native country's dreary weather to Florida, he opened with Englishman in New York, accompanied by Natalie Hoe, the orchestra's 23-year-old principal clarinet....

  8. 10 gifts for $10 or less on Central Avenue in St. Petersburg

    Pop Culture

    You can soon be done with your holiday shopping after less than an hour on Central Avenue in downtown St. Petersburg.

    Here are 10 great gifts for $10 or under for the teachers, neighbors, friends, frenemies, kids, baby sitters, coworkers, clients, cousins and canines on your list.

    1. Holiday spreaders, $10. ZaZoo'd, 531 Central Ave.

    2. Wooden peg dolls like old school Fisher-Price, $5 and $8. Strands of Sunshine, 633 Central Ave. ...

  9. Fourth Street's mom and pop motels are a dying breed

    News

    ST. PETERSBURG — Billboards as far north as Tennessee beckoned tourists by the thousands to St. Petersburg's Fourth Street calling it "the longest motel street in the world" in the 1940s and '50s. There were 95 motels between the Gandy Bridge and Central Avenue in 1955, according to an article that year in the St. Petersburg Times. The strip was dubbed "the great white way" because of all the neon signs lighting it up at night. Locals drove out-of-town guests from one end to the other to show off St. Petersburg's own version of the Las Vegas Strip....

    Vijay Patel, owner of the Kings Rest Motel makes a bed in a guest room. CHERIE DIEZ   |   Times

  10. Fourth Street's mom and pop motels a dying breed

    Tourism

    ST. PETERSBURG — Billboards as far north as Tennessee beckoned tourists by the thousands to St. Petersburg's Fourth Street calling it "the longest motel street in the world" in the 1940s and '50s. There were 95 motels between the Gandy Bridge and Central Avenue in 1955, according to an article that year in the St. Petersburg Times. The strip was dubbed "the great white way" because of all the neon signs lighting it up at night. Locals drove out-of-town guests from one end to the other to show off St. Petersburg's own version of the Las Vegas Strip....

    A postcard promoting the Lewis Palm Park Motel, 4100 Fourth St. N, St. Petersburg. A branch of the Wells Fargo Bank is at that address today.
  11. Charity supporting 9/11 victims' families is model for many

    News

    Edie Lutnick initially was relieved to receive a call from her brother Gary, who worked for Cantor Fitzgerald finance firm in One World Trade Center on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001.

    "I said 'Thank God you aren't there,' and he said, 'Edie, I am here,' and that was the end of my world,' '' Lutnick recounted as the keynote speaker at the YMCA Mayor's Prayer Breakfast.

    She also worked as a lawyer in the building, but a client had canceled an appointment that morning, so she delayed going into the office. Her other brother, Howard Lutnick, Cantor Fitzgerald president, wasn't in the building either when a hijacked plane hit the tower, because he was taking his son to his first day of kindergarten....

    YMCA President & CEO David Jezek, Mary Brandes, YMCA Board Chair David Neely and Bertha James. Brandes received the Chester James Award.
  12. Star Wars makes for a bright night at the Museum of Fine Arts

    News

    11.17.17

    Museum of Fine Arts patrons toured the "Star Wars and the Power of the Costume" exhibit before it opened to the public at the "First Look Cantina" party where "intergalactic cocktail" was the suggested attire.

    Erin Aebel, a member of the board of trustees, was happy to comply with a hat made just for the occasion. The fascinator featured a silver planet with a gold ring. Stars and planets were painted on the heels of her black pumps....

    Trustee Erin Aebel had a fascinator made for the occasion.[Katherine Snow Smith / Times]
  13. Bruce Watters Jewelers, one of St. Petersburg's oldest businesses, closing its doors

    News

    ST. PETERSBURG — The phrases "I'm so sad," and "I was so surprised" rang steadily throughout the first day of Bruce Watters Jewelers' going out of business sale Tuesday as customers lamented the end of the family-owned operation that has operated in St. Petersburg for 112 years.

    "It's sad. It's been an institution for so long," customer Glenn Mosby said.

    Owner Jim Watters is retiring and closing the business his grandfather started and his father moved from Central Avenue to Beach Drive in 1974. He took the reins in 1998....

    Jim Watters helps a customer at his store's going out of business sale.[Katherine Snow Smith / Times]
  14. Community celebrates The Weekly Challenger and its founder

    Human Interest

    Nikki Gaskin-Capehart reminded the crowd packing the Coliseum for the 50th anniversary of The Weekly Challenger of an important milestone in many St. Petersburg lives over the past five decades.

    "How many of you remember the first time you saw your picture in The Weekly Challenger?" she asked. "Some of us have to remember a little further back than others," she added with a laugh....

    Keirsten Johnson and her mother, Lyn Johnson, publisher and editor of The Weekly Challenger, celebrated their legacy.
  15. Hometown Halloween Horror(w/video)

    Events

    More than 2,000 Halloween revelers will converge in St. Petersburg's Old Northeast Neighborhood tonight where many houses go all out for trick-or-treaters. Spooky themes this year include a haunted orphanage with eerie vintage masks, Game of Bones, flying saucers made of pool umbrellas and everyone's favorite sewer clown from the movie It.